Cressida Heyes Phd

Dead to the World: Rape, Unconsciousness, and Social Media

This major article is now out in the journal Signs 41:2, January 2016: 361-383.

Here’s a pre-print version that includes all the images referred to in the text.

Here is a teaching worksheet I put together for instructors who want to include this article on their syllabi, whether in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Philosophy, or Media Studies.

NEWS:

I’ve decided to post here stories in the news about assaults on unconscious victims. Sadly, there is a steady flow:

In January 2015 a woman was sexually assaulted on the Stanford University campus while unconscious behind a dumpster. Brock Turner, the student athlete who was found guilty of sexual assault, was sentenced to six months in jail (he served three). Here is her powerful statement in court. The Guardian newspaper has a lot of online coverage of the case and its fallout.

A similar case in Massachusetts provoked related debates about white and male privilege in the legal system.

Slate’s feature on sexual assaults on long-haul overnight flights and the failures of the airline industry to respond appropriately.

A case in an Austin hotel.

A Halifax taxi driver is found not guilty of sexually assaulting a drunk, unconscious woman in his cab. Judge declares that “clearly, a drunk can consent.” Here’s some Toronto Star coverage of the legal issues involved in the Halifax case.

What’s it about?

A recent popular focus on sexual assault cases involving women who are unconscious—whether because drunk, drugged, anesthetized, in a coma, or asleep—has drawn attention to the role of social media in both exacerbating and gaining redress for the harms of rape while unconscious. To be violated while “dead to the world” is a complex wrong: it scarcely seems to count as a “lived experience” at all, yet it often shatters the victim’s body schema and world. This essay situates cultural anxiety about women’s unconsciousness and sexual assault while offering a phenomenological analysis of its harms. Sexual assault in these situations, and especially rape (defined as penetration of the body by another object or body part), exploits and reinforces any victim’s absence from the shared world, and exposes her body in ways that make it especially difficult for her to reconstitute herself as a subject. It damages both her ability to engage with the world in four dimensions (through a temporally persisting body schema) and her ability to retreat from it into anonymity.

Steubenvilledemo

Although this phenomenological analysis is generalizable, the exposure of the body’s surface and the two-dimensional visibility it analyses are wrongs within the context of the racialization and sexualization of bodies. Drawing on Frantz Fanon’s account of the racial-epidermal schema in the context of Merleau-Ponty’s analysis of “night” and anonymity, the article argues that rape while unconscious can make the restful anonymity of sleep impossible, leaving only the violent exposure of a two-dimensional life. This effect is doubled and redoubled for women in visibly racialized and sexually stereotyped groups—who are, contra media fixation, the more likely to be sexually assaulted.

There is another layer to this lived experience: the way the assault is played back to the victim after the fact can draw out the experience in a way that forecloses her future, and this is especially true given contemporary communications technologies. By providing a richer phenomenological analysis of the lived experience of rape in these circumstances, and by showing its complexity and ubiquity, I hope to undermine the trivialization of this kind of offense, and to challenge pervasive attitudes of victim blaming that permeate popular commentary on sexual violence against women who are unconscious or semiconscious.

Stanfordrapist

I gave various pieces of the article as talks around North America and in the UK in 2014 and 2015 and that was very helpful for its development. I’ve also heard from many students and academics that they are longing for philosophically engaged work on sexual violence that can be taught, to supplement various kinds of political work or administrative action against sexual assault, especially on campus.

Reference:

Cressida J. Heyes, “Dead to the World: Rape, Unconsciousness, and Social Media.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 41:2, January 2016.

 

Teaching

On sabbatical 2017-18

Publications

Dead to the World: Rape, Unconsciousness, and Social Media

Events

2017-18 speakers TBC